Should heads up be in quotes?

Should heads up have an apostrophe?

The warning “Heads up” has no apostrophe.

What is a professional way to say heads up?

What is another word for heads up?

look out beware
watch out be watchful
take heed be alert
pay attention be careful
be vigilant beware of

How do you use give a heads up in a sentence?

to tell someone that something is going to happen: I just wanted to give you all a heads up that we will be talking about the first two chapters of the book tomorrow.

What can I say instead of heads up?

Synonyms of heads-up

  • admonishment,
  • admonition,
  • alarm.
  • (also alarum),
  • alert,
  • caution,
  • forewarning,
  • notice,

How do you say professional heads up in an email?

This phrase is used to thank someone for sharing information in advance. For example, if you receive an email saying: “I’ll be away all of next week and will return to work on August 3rd,” you can reply with: ‘Thank you for the advance notice’. A more casual version of the phrase is, “Thank you for the heads-up.”

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Why do we say heads up?

One is to warn someone that something is going to happen, and that he needs to be prepared for whatever may come his way. The expression is also frequently used in everyday contexts to refer to someone who is wide-awake and alert. *We got the heads up about the Chairman’s proposed visit.

What does heads Up mean in slang?

The definition of a heads up is an alert or a warning. … Heads up is defined as something you shout to get someone’s attention.

Where can I use heads up?

As an exclamation, Heads up! is used to call attention to danger or another important matter. As a basic noun, a heads-up is an advance notice or warning.

Why do you say heads up when you should duck?

Similarly soldiers and sportsmen are more aware of their surroundings with their heads up than looking at their feet.

Is it heads up or head’s up?

You’ll have noticed from my examples, though, that I’ve used both “heads up” and “heads-up”. Mirriam Webster includes both as valid spellings, though most other sources seem to use just the “heads-up” spelling. Both work, though using the hyphen may be advisable since more definitions do use it that way.