Your question: What do you need a transformer for?

What are some items in the home that require a transformer?

Big electric appliances such as washing machines and dishwashers use relatively high voltages of 110–240 volts, but electronic devices such as laptop computers and chargers for MP3 players and mobile cellphones use relatively tiny voltages: a laptop needs about 15 volts, an iPod charger needs 12 volts, and a cellphone …

Where are transformers used around the home?

Transformers are used virtually everywhere, including power generation plants, industrial factories, commercial spaces, and residential areas. They can be as tall as a multi-storey building, or even small enough to fit inside an electric toothbrush.

Do transformers change AC to DC?

A transformer cannot convert AC to DC or DC to AC. The transformer has the ability to step up or decrease current. A step-up transformer is a transformer that raises the voltage from the primary to the secondary. The voltage is reduced from primary to secondary by the step-down transformer.

How do you know if you need a transformer?

You will need a step-down voltage transformer if you’re traveling to any country with a power standard that is higher than what your appliances use. Conversely, taking appliances that run on 220–110 volts to the U.S. or Canada requires a step-up voltage converter that can transform 110–120 volts up to 220–240 volts.

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What appliances have step-up transformers?

While this is done to make it suitable for general use, there are certain appliances like electrical motors, microwaves, X-ray machines etc. that require a high voltage to start. A step-up transformer is used to convert the existing power supply to the desired voltage.

How do transformers work?

The core of the transformer works to direct the path of the magnetic field between the primary and secondary coils to prevent wasted energy. Once the magnetic field reaches the secondary coil, it forces the electrons within it to move, creating an electric current via electromotive force (EMF).