What is the carbonate compensation depth CCD and how does it affect deep sea sedimentation?

What is the calcium carbonate compensation depth CCD?

The carbonate compensation depth, or CCD, is defined as the water depth at which the rate of supply of calcium carbonate from the surface is equal to the rate of dissolution. As long as the ocean floor lies above the CCD, carbonate particles will accumulate in bottom sediments, but below, there is no net accumulation.

What is the significance of the carbonate compensation depth CCD )? How might ocean acidification affect the CCD?

What is the significance of the carbonate compensation depth (CCD)? how might ocean acidification affect the CCD? The depth provided by the CCD gives us the threshold in which calcium carbonate is dissolved. Acidification could cause the CCD to rise and slower coral reef growth and production of calcium carbonate.

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What is the CCD and how does it affect Biogenous sediment?

At the Calcium Carbonate Compensation Depth (CCD) accumulation equals dissolution. As sea floor moves apart and becomes deeper than CCD, carbonate deposits are covered by either siliceous ooze (high production areas) or abyssal clay (open ocean basins away from high productivity).

What affects the depth of the carbonate compensation depth?

calcite compensation depth (CCD), in oceanography, the depth at which the rate of carbonate accumulation equals the rate of carbonate dissolution. … Variation in input, productivity, and dissolution rates in the geologic past have caused the CCD to vary over 2,000 metres (about 6,600 feet).

How does increasing co2 in the ocean affect the calcium carbonate compensation depth?

High CO2levels make the water more acidic. The depth where all three of these effects show their might, where CaCO3 starts to dissolve rapidly, is called the lysocline. As you go down through this depth, seafloor mud starts to lose its CaCO3 content—it is less and less calcareous.

What would happen if the depth of the CCD were above the top of the mid ocean ridge?

What would happen if the depth of the CCD were above the top of the mid-ocean ridge? Calcareous ooze would not be found below the CCD.

What is the carbonate compensation depth quizlet?

What is the Carbonate Compensation Depth (CCD)? Calcium Carbonate Compensation Depth (CCD) the depth at which the rate of accumulation of calcareous sediments equals the rate of dissolution. Be able to describe why calcareous oozes (CaCO3) are not found in the deep ocean bottom.

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How is the carbonate compensation depth CCD related to the worldwide distribution of calcareous oozes?

The carbonate compensation depth (CCD) is the dominant facies boundary on the deep-sea floor. It separates calcareous from noncalcareous sediments, with the calcareous deposits (“carbonate ooze”) restricted roughly to the shallower half of the deep-sea floor.

What is the calcium carbonate compensation depth is there a compensation depth for the siliceous components of once living things?

Is there a compensation depth for the siliceous components of once living things? The depth in the oceans below which the rate of supply of calcite lags behind the rate of solution, such that no calcite is preserved.

Why has the calcium carbonate compensation depth no effect on the sedimentation of diatoms?

Because they are primary producers, diatoms are found in nutrient-rich areas of the ocean especially in areas of upwelling like the polar seas. … Calcium carbonate dissolves readily under pressure and in cold water, therefore deeper ocean floors will have less calcareous ooze.

What factors control the depth of the CCD calcite compensation depth )?

Factors that affect the depth of the lysocline and the compensation depth include:

  • Water temperature.
  • Depth.
  • CO 2 concentration.
  • pH (high pH values aid in carbonate preservation)
  • Amount of carbonate sediment supply.
  • Amount of terrigenous sediment supply.