Should there be an apostrophe in heads up?

Which is correct heads up or head up?

You’ll have noticed from my examples, though, that I’ve used both “heads up” and “heads-up”. Mirriam Webster includes both as valid spellings, though most other sources seem to use just the “heads-up” spelling. Both work, though using the hyphen may be advisable since more definitions do use it that way.

How do you use the phrase heads up?

a warning that something is going to happen, usually so that you can prepare for it: This note is just to give you a heads-up that Vicky will be arriving next week. a short talk or statement about how a situation or plan is developing: The boss called a meeting to give us a heads-up on the way the project was going.

Is heads up singular or plural?

The plural form of heads-up is heads-up or heads-ups.

Is it rude to say heads up?

As you said, the term “heads up” is informal. However, it is so common in American English that we use it in almost every situation. “Heads up” can be used as a noun. It sends a message that says something is going to happen.

What is a formal way of saying heads up?

Synonyms for heads-up. admonishment, admonition, alarm.

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Why do we say heads up?

One is to warn someone that something is going to happen, and that he needs to be prepared for whatever may come his way. The expression is also frequently used in everyday contexts to refer to someone who is wide-awake and alert. *We got the heads up about the Chairman’s proposed visit.

What is mean by heads up?

: a message that alerts or prepares : warning gave him a heads-up that an investigation was pending. heads up. interjection.

How do you say professional heads up in an email?

This phrase is used to thank someone for sharing information in advance. For example, if you receive an email saying: “I’ll be away all of next week and will return to work on August 3rd,” you can reply with: ‘Thank you for the advance notice’. A more casual version of the phrase is, “Thank you for the heads-up.”