Frequent question: Do you put a comma after just a heads up?

How do you use just a heads up?

to tell someone that something is going to happen: I just wanted to give you all a heads up that we will be talking about the first two chapters of the book tomorrow.

Which is correct heads up or head up?

You’ll have noticed from my examples, though, that I’ve used both “heads up” and “heads-up”. Mirriam Webster includes both as valid spellings, though most other sources seem to use just the “heads-up” spelling. Both work, though using the hyphen may be advisable since more definitions do use it that way.

How do you say just a heads up?

heads-up

  1. admonishment,
  2. admonition,
  3. alarm.
  4. (also alarum),
  5. alert,
  6. caution,
  7. forewarning,
  8. notice,

How do you say heads up in email?

This phrase is used to thank someone for sharing information in advance. For example, if you receive an email saying: “I’ll be away all of next week and will return to work on August 3rd,” you can reply with: ‘Thank you for the advance notice’. A more casual version of the phrase is, “Thank you for the heads-up.”

Is there a hyphen in heads up?

A common idiomatic phrase in English is to “give someone a heads-up” about something. This means that you want to warn somebody about something that is going to happen. … In this case, “heads-up” is a noun and it takes a hyphen.

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Why do you say heads up when you should duck?

Similarly soldiers and sportsmen are more aware of their surroundings with their heads up than looking at their feet.

Is it rude to say heads up?

As you said, the term “heads up” is informal. However, it is so common in American English that we use it in almost every situation. “Heads up” can be used as a noun. It sends a message that says something is going to happen.

What can I say instead of thanks for the heads up?

Alternatives

  • Thank you for the advance notice. …
  • Thanks for letting me know. …
  • Thanks for the warning.
  • Thanks for tipping me off.