Best answer: What is a compensator delete?

What is the purpose of a Harley compensator?

What Does It Do? The compensator sprocket dampens (reduces) torsional vibration created by the crankshaft so it is not transmitted through the drivetrain causing rider discomfort and premature component wear.

Do Sportsters have compensators?

Sportsters do have compensators; however, they are commonly referred to as the “primary,” or “triple.”

What does a bad compensator sound like?

The symptoms of a bad compensator are a loud clang at start up, trouble shifting into first or neutral and a sound like gravel in the front of the primary around 2200 RPM. But, the only way to know for sure that you have this problem is to pull the primary cover off and look.

How long does a Harley compensator last?

With the unmodified SE comp, you should get at least 10,000 to 15,000 miles of trouble free operation, much improved from the previous compensator.

How do you know if your compensator is bad?

The symptoms of a bad compensator are a loud clang at start up, trouble shifting into first or neutral and a sound like gravel in the front of the primary around 2200 RPM.

IT IS IMPORTANT:  Question: Whats another word for stood me up?

How much does Harley charge to replace clutch?

How much does Harley charge to replace clutch? Air filter replacement cost on Harley-Davidson is estimated at $100 to $200, whereas the ‘Brake Pad’ needs $250 for the replacement. Clutch replacement cost is $200 to $450 on average.

What happens if primary chain is loose?

A loose primary chain can cause surging, chain slap, and primary case damage due to the chain being whipped around in the primary.

How much does it cost to replace a compensator on a Harley Davidson?

The compensator Part #42200064A costs $299.95 on Harley’s website.

What does a loose primary chain sound like?

If the chain is too tight, you’ll feel it (might feel jerky, especially when it’s hot), but a loose chain usually you’ll hear, particularly when cold, a slap that kind of just goes “tick, tick, tick, tick”.